Seeing “Red”.

We went to see the excellent play called “Red” by John Logan, on Friday evening, up in the West End. Set in Mark Rothko’s Bowery studio in Manhattan, during the late 1950’s, when he was in the process of creating the Seagram murals for the Four Seasons Restaurant. A project that was abandoned1959-60, with the Tate Gallery in London being the beneficiary of a decade or so later.

The play has just 2 actors, Alfred Molina as Rothko, and Alfred Enoch as his assistant, Ken, with no interval and intense dialogue (you have to admire the actors), the thought processes going on in the painters head are well developed with Ken being the innocent simple foil against the complexities of Rothko.

There is, at the end, just a hint that the tide had turned with Ken moving on, and Rothko in a slight mental knot which may have led to the pulling of the plug on the commission, and eventually into the drinking and depression that followed through the 1960’s.

This play has left me wanting to read and find out more on Rothko, and his thinking. Leaves me to say, thank you Jane for taking me.

300718 - Seeing Red

Waiting room at Charing Cross station.

Finding Adam Dant at The Map House.

Finding The Map House is easy if you have a map. I thought I would try my hand at cartography and draw you one:
260718 - Map House 1

OK – not very good, but it should get you there.

I’ve always been interested in maps, whether they are modern day Google maps, Ordnance Survey maps, or ancient maps way back before the globe, when they thought that the world was flat, and if you sailed too far west you would fall off the edge.

Adam Dant’s exhibition “Maps of London & Beyond” was only on for a couple of weeks or so, and I went along on the last day. The maps are social, satirical, and very observantly drawn with a bunch of history thrown in for good measure. Drawn painstakingly in pen and ink with watercolour tinting these are very witty documents.

260718 - Map House 3The Maps and views he depicts are so detailed and full of tiny observations of everyday life, it is evident that he has been to “St James’s Square,” “Sloane Square,” or wherever, spending time with a sketchbook, and keeping his eyes open. Wonderful.

Other maps are themed, such as “Shoreditch 3000” showing the archaeology of the area, looking back from the year 3000. “Museum of the Deep” details all the shipwrecks in the Thames estuary – it is a crowded place!

My favourites were one called “Argotopolis” which shows the topology of London slang, and another called “London Enraged” which maps out all the riots and upheavals in London throughout history ranging from Boudica in AD 60, to the Brixton riots of 1981, 1985, and 1995.

260718 - Map House 2The Map House itself is fascinating enough. It is not a wide frontage onto the street, and you enter as though into a ship’s cabin of a room, but it reaches back a long way with various staircases going up and down onto different decks. It is like being on a sailing ship. With walls adorned with maps and charts, you can easily imagine yourself at sea. All you need is a ship’s wheel to steer, and a parrot on your shoulder. Well worth a visit, even if the Adam Dant exhibition is sadly now finished.

Trying to understand deckchairs.

I’m sure that there are plenty of comedy acts about putting up deckchairs and failing. It seems to me an equally impossible job to draw them successfully. Perhaps I haven’t the patience.

230718 - Deckchairs 1In London’s Green Park (or “Brown Park”, or “Straw-coloured Park”, as the heat-wave seems to have repainted it) the deckchairs have already been put up for you, but as I was idly drinking my coffee, I could see a game of Cat and Mouse going on, as people dodged around trying to avoid paying the attendant with his ticket machine.

230718 - Deckchairs 3When you are trying to draw or paint them, the deckchairs always seem to have too many bits of wood, or frames, and does this interlock with this, or that? Do they go in front or behind the canvas seat?

And what about the stripes? Deckchairs always seem to be striped. Yet more lines to get entangled with when drawing! Always a mess, but fun to draw all the same.

230718 - Deckchairs 2Deckchairs are never that comfortable to sit in anyway I find, and there is always that fear of imminent collapse as you sink into one, and the difficulty of getting out in a hurry as the deckchair attendant draws near… –  “OK you win, here is you £2.80 for an hour…”

Personally, I prefer to sit or lay on the grass anyway. So much less hassle. I like the easy life, although I do think I need to set myself the challenge of drawing, or painting, deckchairs again sometime – keep going with my attempts until I can get the hang of it…

230718 - Deckchairs 4Not there yet!

 

Promenading with the promenaders.

210718 - Prom1Yesterday evening we went to the Proms at the Royal Albert Hall to enjoy an evening of culture with, amongst others, Mendelsohn and Schumann. I arrive slightly early, and whilst waiting for Jane, I sat on a wall and pulled out my little sketchbook to do some sketching of the promenaders as they began to appear.

5 pencil drawings in total (including the above, done in double quick time…

 

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Jumping off the wall, Humpty Dumpty nearly had a great fall, and narrowly avoided landing in the picnic laid out between two young ladies. It was a close thing between me, a delicious looking brie, and some crackers! Emerged unscathed, but abashed.

Last Paintings. Howard Hodgkin R.I.P.

 

190718 - HH - Grosvenor Hill

Grosvenor Hill, London W1

I got lost looking for the Gagosian Gallery which is presently showing the Last Paintings of Howard Hodgkin.

Well, not exactly lost. I did manage to find Grosvenor Hill OK, but then proceeded to walk straight past the gallery without a second glance.

Eventually, by retracing my steps, and by process of elimination, it had to be the big modern building on the corner.

Stupid!

 

190718 - HH - Gagosian outside

Gagosian Gallery, London W1

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St. George’s shed

I took the train up to London on Saturday, and for a fleeting moment, as we sped past an allotment, I saw this shed and hastened to do a sketch of it whilst it was still fresh in my mind.

150718 - St George's shedI thought it kind of appropriate (as England were playing Belgium for 3rd place in the football world cup that day), and somehow quintessentially English, to have attached the St George’s flag to a garden shed in the middle of an idle allotment, somewhere in the south east of England, as the sun shone brightly.