Footprints 1 – Following me around.

I can’t remember when or where I drew these footprints. I dug them out the other day, when looking for something else. A complete mystery, but obviously from somewhere.

It reminds me of the quote from Rodin in my previous blog “Walking with Rodin.” and I deliberately mis-quote him here: “It is not my Footprints in themselves that interests me, but rather the thought of where they have come from, and where they are going to.” Having unearthed them, they already seem to be following me around the house a bit. I’m wondering if they are about to disappear all by themselves behind a cupboard or something, and re-emerge again in 5 years time, to haunt me.

As to what animal it is – that I think must have come out of my imagination. Polar Bear, Mammoth, Yeti? Perhaps I will have to lie in wait, and see if the animal that produced them appears again.

They are not mine – I have ascertained that. Although I did draw them. Or did I?

Walking with Rodin.

When he was talking about his sculpture “The Walking Man,” Rodin comes up with the wonderful quote: “It is not my Walking Man in himself that interests me, but rather the thought of how far he has come, and how far he has yet to cover.”

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“The Burghers of Calais” being paraded before the public.

This quote I feel applies both to the recent British Museum exhibition “Rodin and the art of ancient Greece,” which examines the influence of the sculptures from antiquity, in particular the Parthenon, on Rodin, and also Rodin’s own philosophy that enjoyed the effect that time has on sculptures (the lack of limbs, heads and general knocks that they have taken over the millennia), and makes a feature of it in his own work.

The Elgin marbles in the British Museum never really grabbed my attention before, but this exhibition made me have a truly great respect and admiration for the sculpture created by Pheidias. The man was a genius in how he could transform and manipulate the cold hard and heavy marble into living flesh, and to make it look as if it weighed hardly anything.

090818 r2Apart from the drawing at the top of Rodin’s “The Burghers of Calais”, for which I found a convenient seat, it was too crowded in the exhibition to be able to draw anything comfortably, so I took myself off to the Parthenon Gallery within the British Museum to view the remnants that didn’t make it to the exhibition, and here I managed to draw this horses head, originally one of four that was pulling a god’s chariot from out of the waves.

 

London planes land at Victoria Embankment Gardens.

No, they didn’t miss Heathrow. These are London plane trees at the Victoria Embankment Gardens in London, where I recently took shelter from a thunderstorm. Instead I got rained on from on high by ready-made sculpture; manna from heaven.

It was an eerie light because of the storm. The grass under the trees looked nearly white, both with the storm, and through being parched dry from lack of rain.

The trees were shedding their bark profusely, something they do naturally apparently, not down to the dry weather as I first thought. I nearly got hit on the head at one point!

The resulting debris on the ground took on sculptural qualities reminiscent of body parts; here a back-bone, there an arm, is that an elephant trunk?

Security Breach at Russell Square!

 

020818 - Security 1Jumping out at Russell Square tube station, I noticed these doors at the end of the platform and was immediately drawn in by the arrangement of the security seal tape, and it’s constant removal and replacement along the vertical openings of the doors.

020818 - Security 2There is something paradoxical that the seals have been put in place and removed so many times. The cabinets being broken into, and then taped over again and again, as if some drama, a crime thriller is taking place with the repeat button firmly pushed down.

020818 - Security 3The vertical arrangement also reminds me strongly of the “Hanging Soap Women, 2000” sculpture by the Polish artist Miroslav Balka, of which, I believe, half of it is in the Tate Modern collection, and half of it is at the White Cube Gallery, after the original length was cut in two. This beautiful sculpture made of a large quantity of used bars of soap in lots of different colours and strung up along a metal cable is well worth hunting down to have a look at. It does have an underlying message as well, which has got absolutely nothing to do with what is going on in Russell Square, but perhaps you can see the connection.

020818 - Security 4Back to the mystery of what is going on behind these doors!

What makes it so worthwhile for somebody to break in so many times, risking capture, torture, possibly even death, and yet still persist?

 

Seeing “Red”.

We went to see the excellent play called “Red” by John Logan, on Friday evening, up in the West End. Set in Mark Rothko’s Bowery studio in Manhattan, during the late 1950’s, when he was in the process of creating the Seagram murals for the Four Seasons Restaurant. A project that was abandoned1959-60, with the Tate Gallery in London being the beneficiary of a decade or so later.

The play has just 2 actors, Alfred Molina as Rothko, and Alfred Enoch as his assistant, Ken, with no interval and intense dialogue (you have to admire the actors), the thought processes going on in the painters head are well developed with Ken being the innocent simple foil against the complexities of Rothko.

There is, at the end, just a hint that the tide had turned with Ken moving on, and Rothko in a slight mental knot which may have led to the pulling of the plug on the commission, and eventually into the drinking and depression that followed through the 1960’s.

This play has left me wanting to read and find out more on Rothko, and his thinking. Leaves me to say, thank you Jane for taking me.

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Waiting room at Charing Cross station.

Finding Adam Dant at The Map House.

Finding The Map House is easy if you have a map. I thought I would try my hand at cartography and draw you one:
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OK – not very good, but it should get you there.

I’ve always been interested in maps, whether they are modern day Google maps, Ordnance Survey maps, or ancient maps way back before the globe, when they thought that the world was flat, and if you sailed too far west you would fall off the edge.

Adam Dant’s exhibition “Maps of London & Beyond” was only on for a couple of weeks or so, and I went along on the last day. The maps are social, satirical, and very observantly drawn with a bunch of history thrown in for good measure. Drawn painstakingly in pen and ink with watercolour tinting these are very witty documents.

260718 - Map House 3The Maps and views he depicts are so detailed and full of tiny observations of everyday life, it is evident that he has been to “St James’s Square,” “Sloane Square,” or wherever, spending time with a sketchbook, and keeping his eyes open. Wonderful.

Other maps are themed, such as “Shoreditch 3000” showing the archaeology of the area, looking back from the year 3000. “Museum of the Deep” details all the shipwrecks in the Thames estuary – it is a crowded place!

My favourites were one called “Argotopolis” which shows the topology of London slang, and another called “London Enraged” which maps out all the riots and upheavals in London throughout history ranging from Boudica in AD 60, to the Brixton riots of 1981, 1985, and 1995.

260718 - Map House 2The Map House itself is fascinating enough. It is not a wide frontage onto the street, and you enter as though into a ship’s cabin of a room, but it reaches back a long way with various staircases going up and down onto different decks. It is like being on a sailing ship. With walls adorned with maps and charts, you can easily imagine yourself at sea. All you need is a ship’s wheel to steer, and a parrot on your shoulder. Well worth a visit, even if the Adam Dant exhibition is sadly now finished.