Tacita Dean: Antigone 4 – It looks like we missed the sunset.

230818 - TB28aThe forth and final part of my instant drawings from the showing of Tacita Dean’s film “Antigone.”

230818 - TB25a

230818 - TB29

The other parts (if you haven’t seen them yet, and want to!) can be seen here:
Antigone 1 – Where did I get the courage to put out my eyes?
Antigone 2 – Why did it take so long? …to get from there to here?
Antigone 3 – How did I get my name?

Tacita Dean: Antigone 3 – How did I get my name?

 

220818 - TB17a

Oedipus

Part 3 of my instant sketches from the showing of the Tacita Dean film “Antigone.”

Assuming you would like to…
The other posts connected to this film can be found below:
Antigone 1 – Where did I get the courage to put out my eyes?
Antigone 2 – Why did it take so long? …to get from there to here?

Tacita Dean: Antigone 1 – Where did I get the courage to put out my eyes?

160818 - TB1a

The following sketches, and the ones I’m going to put in the next three blog posts, were all drawn at lightening speed – just a few seconds each – trying to capture the thrill of seeing Tacita Dean’s film “Antigone” that was being shown at the Royal Academy in London. Screen shots – a moment in time.

Continue reading

Last Paintings. Howard Hodgkin R.I.P.

 

190718 - HH - Grosvenor Hill

Grosvenor Hill, London W1

I got lost looking for the Gagosian Gallery which is presently showing the Last Paintings of Howard Hodgkin.

Well, not exactly lost. I did manage to find Grosvenor Hill OK, but then proceeded to walk straight past the gallery without a second glance.

Eventually, by retracing my steps, and by process of elimination, it had to be the big modern building on the corner.

Stupid!

 

190718 - HH - Gagosian outside

Gagosian Gallery, London W1

Continue reading

Meet Jock. He’s a hot water bottle.

280118 - JockI was inspired to draw / paint this after visiting the Rachel Whiteread exhibition at Tate Britain last weekend. She had cast quite a few “Torso’s” by filling up hot water bottles with various materials, plaster, resin etc. and then, presumably, removing the outer rubber “skin”. It’s alright Jock – I wouldn’t dream of doing that to you!

I must admit, if you did lop off the head, arms and legs of somebody (please don’t try this at home, or anywhere else for that matter!), then yes – you can see the resemblance to the inflated insides of a hot water bottle.

Rachel Whiteread likes turning your mind inside-out and back-to-front with casts of stairs, windows, sheds, baths, bookshelves (I liked these!), and rather infamously a complete terraced house (sadly now demolished under rather controversial circumstances). It is the voids, the spaces inbetween that she captures so well.

The papier-mâché shed end exhibited here took me back to seeing the inside-out shed installed in the grounds of Houghton Hall in Norfolk that which we visited last year. In particular, I liked the cast detail of the bolt from the inside of the shed door, especially as a caterpillar was crawling up the side (bottom left of the right hand picture). It made it seem so real!

280118 - RW TBLastly, I have to share this with you. This is Rachel Whiteread’s “Untitled (One Hundred Spaces)” from 1995, which filled one of the main Duveen Galleries at Tate Britain. Each of the 100 pieces is a cast in various coloured resins of the underside of a found chair. Really beautiful!

Embracing Yorkshire weather

We’ve been up in North Yorkshire for the last few days, and the weather has been wonderful in it’s contrasting forms, from bright sun on a frosty morn, to heavy snow showers.

The 3 images above, although totally different from each other are also related, in that they are all images of fleeting moments in time, and none of them exist anymore. I am also not responsible for any of them, although I do make a guest appearance in one of them.

The picture of shadows on the left, elongated by the low sun and downward slope of the hill was taken by my wife, Jane, on a walk towards the river Nidd in Darley. Can shadows be art? Why not – you have shadow puppets on stage performing, and as so often in Richard Long’s work, the photograph is the only record of the artwork that is left.

The leaves in the snow have been arranged like a roulade. It is in fact a large collapsed snowball that had been made by hands unknown on the Stray in Harrogate. The snowball was rolled under trees and the leaves that were on the ground stuck to the snowball as it was trundled around making this pattern when broken open. Is that an animal looking at me?

Lastly, we have the snow sculptures sat happily on the parapet of a Harrogate railway bridge as dusk settled around us. Hail, the unknown artists!

Somebody who has a fine feel for depicting the weather is Katharine Holmes. She was a near contemporary of mine at Newcastle University, who lives and works in Yorkshire. There was an exhibition of her work at Harrogate’s Mercer Art Gallery that we went to see whilst we were there. She has an assured style; a handling of oil, and acrylics that gives her paintings a real innate and naturalistic feel whatever the weather, wherever the place. I loved her sketchbooks on display, with the ink drawings occasionally reminding me of some of the work of former Cumbrian artist Percy Kelly.